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Therapy Partners are pleased to announce that they will be running an exclusive NLP Intensive Life Coaching Course from 1st to 7th October 2018 at Maidstone Community Support Centre.

 

Why become a life coach?

Do you love to help people? Do you enjoy flexibility within your work? Do you enjoy encouraging others to live by their own principles? Life coaching may be for you!

Over the past 10 years, Life Coaching has become a popular career choice, with coaches charging upward of £100 per hour of personal coaching, developing their own unique coaching packages, and becoming their own bosses.

Whether you want to be a life coach, executive coach, coach in an organization or any other field, the NLP Life Coach course will help you achieve your aspirations.

What will I learn?

The course is taught by ICF certified NLP trainer, Wayne Farrell who will help you to develop key life coaching skills and concepts, and how to implement them, including;

  • How to set goals and install them in your future
  • Wheel of life
  • Default Diary 
  • Attitude of Gratitude 
  • A number of Time Management check lists
  • Order of Importance
  • What to let go of
  • Utilizing anchors to create desired state at any time.

You will learn how to inspire others to live their passion, whilst you do the same. You will learn how to let go of limiting beliefs, self-doubt, negative emotions and all the things that have held you back in the past.
The skills you will learn during this training will empower you to coach in various niches. You will learn how to create massive positive change in your life and those of the people you work with.
The life coaching courses are based on the ICF core competencies but go even further and deeper than that. You will acquire certification that will afford you the ability to coach anywhere in the world. 

How much does it cost?

Therapy partners have negotiated a discounted price of only £997 per person, including 7 days of intensive expert training in a small group (max 12), access to 80 online learning resource videos and certificates upon completion. A percentage of the proceeds will go towards our charity supporting children and young people with eating disorders, Rewrite Your Story.

What will I achieve?

You will become a certified Life Coach with an in-depth expert qualification gained via face to face, interactive learning – already putting you ahead of your competitors, most of whom will have achieved a qualification online, or not at all.

On successful completion of this training you will receive 3 internationally recognized certificates in NLP, Coaching and Time Line Therapy (TM).

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

We should be making an effort to stay hydrated every day, but it becomes particularly important in the heat, especially for children who are more likely to become dehydrated and may not recognise the signs of thirst straight away.

Hydration is key to health and wellbeing – are you making sure you’re drinking enough?

Why do I need to drink? I don’t feel thirsty.

For a start, water makes up approximately 2/3 of our body and it helps us to function properly. Water helps the body to remove waste products, keeps the skin looking good, controls temperature and lubricates the joints. It can also aid concentration levels.

Ok, so I need fluid. What should I be drinking and how much?

Adults need approximately 1.5-2 litres a day. The best way to hit your fluid intake is by drinking good old-fashioned water. It’s easily accessible, fat, calorie and sugar free – winner! You can also get your daily fluid intake from:

 

  • Flavoured Water if you find plain water boring, try adding fruit e.g. lemon/lime/orange. [A nice combination is slices of orange and sprigs of rosemary.]
  • Tap water is fine to drink, there is no need to buy bottled water in this country.
  • Fruit juices/smoothies also count as one of your 5 a day but limit them to one a day. When fruit is processed, e.g. blended, the fruit releases more sugars than if you were to eat raw. They can also be acidic which can cause problems for your teeth.
  • Squash try to choose no added sugar or sugar free options, again this will protect your family’s teeth.
  • Milk is great for providing us with vitamins, protein and calcium – we need calcium for healthy teeth and bones. Opt for semi-skimmed or skimmed milk to lower the fat content. Children under 2 should drink full fat milk.
  • Tea/coffee count towards your daily fluid goals as long as you drink them in moderation.  Switch to decaffeinated versions where possible (I know the morning struggle is real!) Caffeine makes you urinate more, leaving you less hydrated! Fruit and herbal teas are good alternatives, (I know what you’re thinking ‘no-one ever solved their problems over a cup of strawberry and chamomile’ but there are some lovely flavours out there!)
  • Fizzy drinks often contain caffeine and sugar. Limit your intake and pick low sugar and caffeine free versions where possible.
  • Alcohol Sorry everyone – that G & T doesn’t count towards your daily fluid intake! Alcohol can dehydrate you…hands up who’s been out for a couple of drinks and walked their 10,000 steps just going back and forwards to the toilet?

Please drink responsibly: in the heat we can often drink quicker than we intend to.

I’ve never been dehydrated surely, I’m ok?

  • Dehydration may not make us feel ill
  • Thirst is usually the first sign
  • We may urinate less and urine may be darker (A well-hydrated person will have light coloured urine)
  • Other signs of dehydration are headaches, feeling tired or dizzy, dry mouth/lips or cramps.

 

What about my children?

Children are more likely to become dehydrated. Children should aim to drink about 6-8 glasses of fluid a day. Water is the best drink for children. Try to encourage your children to have drinks with meals, get them to have extra drinks if being physically active and make sure to pack water in their school bag.

Dehydration can be serious so make sure to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, especially during these hotter months. Pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions may need to drink more fluids than normal so please check with your GP.

Stay healthy,

Leanne x

 

 

 

 

 

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

We should be making an effort to stay hydrated every day, but it becomes particularly important in the heat, especially for children who are more likely to become dehydrated and may not recognise the signs of thirst straight away.

Hydration is key to health and wellbeing – are you making sure you’re drinking enough?

Why do I need to drink? I don’t feel thirsty.

For a start, water makes up approximately 2/3 of our body and it helps us to function properly. Water helps the body to remove waste products, keeps the skin looking good, controls temperature and lubricates the joints. It can also aid concentration levels.

Ok, so I need fluid. What should I be drinking and how much?

Adults need approximately 1.5-2 litres a day. The best way to hit your fluid intake is by drinking good old-fashioned water. It’s easily accessible, fat, calorie and sugar free – winner! You can also get your daily fluid intake from:

 

  • Flavoured Water if you find plain water boring, try adding fruit e.g. lemon/lime/orange. [A nice combination is slices of orange and sprigs of rosemary.]
  • Tap water is fine to drink, there is no need to buy bottled water in this country.
  • Fruit juices/smoothies also count as one of your 5 a day but limit them to one a day. When fruit is processed, e.g. blended, the fruit releases more sugars than if you were to eat raw. They can also be acidic which can cause problems for your teeth.
  • Squash try to choose no added sugar or sugar free options, again this will protect your family’s teeth.
  • Milk is great for providing us with vitamins, protein and calcium – we need calcium for healthy teeth and bones. Opt for semi-skimmed or skimmed milk to lower the fat content. Children under 2 should drink full fat milk.
  • Tea/coffee count towards your daily fluid goals as long as you drink them in moderation.  Switch to decaffeinated versions where possible (I know the morning struggle is real!) Caffeine makes you urinate more, leaving you less hydrated! Fruit and herbal teas are good alternatives, (I know what you’re thinking ‘no-one ever solved their problems over a cup of strawberry and chamomile’ but there are some lovely flavours out there!)
  • Fizzy drinks often contain caffeine and sugar. Limit your intake and pick low sugar and caffeine free versions where possible.
  • Alcohol Sorry everyone – that G & T doesn’t count towards your daily fluid intake! Alcohol can dehydrate you…hands up who’s been out for a couple of drinks and walked their 10,000 steps just going back and forwards to the toilet?

Please drink responsibly: in the heat we can often drink quicker than we intend to.

I’ve never been dehydrated surely, I’m ok?

  • Dehydration may not make us feel ill
  • Thirst is usually the first sign
  • We may urinate less and urine may be darker (A well-hydrated person will have light coloured urine)
  • Other signs of dehydration are headaches, feeling tired or dizzy, dry mouth/lips or cramps.

 

What about my children?

Children are more likely to become dehydrated. Children should aim to drink about 6-8 glasses of fluid a day. Water is the best drink for children. Try to encourage your children to have drinks with meals, get them to have extra drinks if being physically active and make sure to pack water in their school bag.

Dehydration can be serious so make sure to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, especially during these hotter months. Pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions may need to drink more fluids than normal so please check with your GP.

Stay healthy,

Leanne x

 

 

 

 

 

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

We should be making an effort to stay hydrated every day, but it becomes particularly important in the heat, especially for children who are more likely to become dehydrated and may not recognise the signs of thirst straight away.

Hydration is key to health and wellbeing – are you making sure you’re drinking enough?

Why do I need to drink? I don’t feel thirsty.

For a start, water makes up approximately 2/3 of our body and it helps us to function properly. Water helps the body to remove waste products, keeps the skin looking good, controls temperature and lubricates the joints. It can also aid concentration levels.

Ok, so I need fluid. What should I be drinking and how much?

Adults need approximately 1.5-2 litres a day. The best way to hit your fluid intake is by drinking good old-fashioned water. It’s easily accessible, fat, calorie and sugar free – winner! You can also get your daily fluid intake from:

 

  • Flavoured Water if you find plain water boring, try adding fruit e.g. lemon/lime/orange. [A nice combination is slices of orange and sprigs of rosemary.]
  • Tap water is fine to drink, there is no need to buy bottled water in this country.
  • Fruit juices/smoothies also count as one of your 5 a day but limit them to one a day. When fruit is processed, e.g. blended, the fruit releases more sugars than if you were to eat raw. They can also be acidic which can cause problems for your teeth.
  • Squash try to choose no added sugar or sugar free options, again this will protect your family’s teeth.
  • Milk is great for providing us with vitamins, protein and calcium – we need calcium for healthy teeth and bones. Opt for semi-skimmed or skimmed milk to lower the fat content. Children under 2 should drink full fat milk.
  • Tea/coffee count towards your daily fluid goals as long as you drink them in moderation.  Switch to decaffeinated versions where possible (I know the morning struggle is real!) Caffeine makes you urinate more, leaving you less hydrated! Fruit and herbal teas are good alternatives, (I know what you’re thinking ‘no-one ever solved their problems over a cup of strawberry and chamomile’ but there are some lovely flavours out there!)
  • Fizzy drinks often contain caffeine and sugar. Limit your intake and pick low sugar and caffeine free versions where possible.
  • Alcohol Sorry everyone – that G & T doesn’t count towards your daily fluid intake! Alcohol can dehydrate you…hands up who’s been out for a couple of drinks and walked their 10,000 steps just going back and forwards to the toilet?

Please drink responsibly: in the heat we can often drink quicker than we intend to.

I’ve never been dehydrated surely, I’m ok?

  • Dehydration may not make us feel ill
  • Thirst is usually the first sign
  • We may urinate less and urine may be darker (A well-hydrated person will have light coloured urine)
  • Other signs of dehydration are headaches, feeling tired or dizzy, dry mouth/lips or cramps.

 

What about my children?

Children are more likely to become dehydrated. Children should aim to drink about 6-8 glasses of fluid a day. Water is the best drink for children. Try to encourage your children to have drinks with meals, get them to have extra drinks if being physically active and make sure to pack water in their school bag.

Dehydration can be serious so make sure to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, especially during these hotter months. Pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions may need to drink more fluids than normal so please check with your GP.

Stay healthy,

Leanne x

 

 

 

 

 

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

We should be making an effort to stay hydrated every day, but it becomes particularly important in the heat, especially for children who are more likely to become dehydrated and may not recognise the signs of thirst straight away.

Hydration is key to health and wellbeing – are you making sure you’re drinking enough?

Why do I need to drink? I don’t feel thirsty.

For a start, water makes up approximately 2/3 of our body and it helps us to function properly. Water helps the body to remove waste products, keeps the skin looking good, controls temperature and lubricates the joints. It can also aid concentration levels.

Ok, so I need fluid. What should I be drinking and how much?

Adults need approximately 1.5-2 litres a day. The best way to hit your fluid intake is by drinking good old-fashioned water. It’s easily accessible, fat, calorie and sugar free – winner! You can also get your daily fluid intake from:

 

  • Flavoured Water if you find plain water boring, try adding fruit e.g. lemon/lime/orange. [A nice combination is slices of orange and sprigs of rosemary.]
  • Tap water is fine to drink, there is no need to buy bottled water in this country.
  • Fruit juices/smoothies also count as one of your 5 a day but limit them to one a day. When fruit is processed, e.g. blended, the fruit releases more sugars than if you were to eat raw. They can also be acidic which can cause problems for your teeth.
  • Squash try to choose no added sugar or sugar free options, again this will protect your family’s teeth.
  • Milk is great for providing us with vitamins, protein and calcium – we need calcium for healthy teeth and bones. Opt for semi-skimmed or skimmed milk to lower the fat content. Children under 2 should drink full fat milk.
  • Tea/coffee count towards your daily fluid goals as long as you drink them in moderation.  Switch to decaffeinated versions where possible (I know the morning struggle is real!) Caffeine makes you urinate more, leaving you less hydrated! Fruit and herbal teas are good alternatives, (I know what you’re thinking ‘no-one ever solved their problems over a cup of strawberry and chamomile’ but there are some lovely flavours out there!)
  • Fizzy drinks often contain caffeine and sugar. Limit your intake and pick low sugar and caffeine free versions where possible.
  • Alcohol Sorry everyone – that G & T doesn’t count towards your daily fluid intake! Alcohol can dehydrate you…hands up who’s been out for a couple of drinks and walked their 10,000 steps just going back and forwards to the toilet?

Please drink responsibly: in the heat we can often drink quicker than we intend to.

I’ve never been dehydrated surely, I’m ok?

  • Dehydration may not make us feel ill
  • Thirst is usually the first sign
  • We may urinate less and urine may be darker (A well-hydrated person will have light coloured urine)
  • Other signs of dehydration are headaches, feeling tired or dizzy, dry mouth/lips or cramps.

 

What about my children?

Children are more likely to become dehydrated. Children should aim to drink about 6-8 glasses of fluid a day. Water is the best drink for children. Try to encourage your children to have drinks with meals, get them to have extra drinks if being physically active and make sure to pack water in their school bag.

Dehydration can be serious so make sure to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, especially during these hotter months. Pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions may need to drink more fluids than normal so please check with your GP.

Stay healthy,

Leanne x

 

 

 

 

 

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

We should be making an effort to stay hydrated every day, but it becomes particularly important in the heat, especially for children who are more likely to become dehydrated and may not recognise the signs of thirst straight away.

Hydration is key to health and wellbeing – are you making sure you’re drinking enough?

Why do I need to drink? I don’t feel thirsty.

For a start, water makes up approximately 2/3 of our body and it helps us to function properly. Water helps the body to remove waste products, keeps the skin looking good, controls temperature and lubricates the joints. It can also aid concentration levels.

Ok, so I need fluid. What should I be drinking and how much?

Adults need approximately 1.5-2 litres a day. The best way to hit your fluid intake is by drinking good old-fashioned water. It’s easily accessible, fat, calorie and sugar free – winner! You can also get your daily fluid intake from:

 

  • Flavoured Water if you find plain water boring, try adding fruit e.g. lemon/lime/orange. [A nice combination is slices of orange and sprigs of rosemary.]
  • Tap water is fine to drink, there is no need to buy bottled water in this country.
  • Fruit juices/smoothies also count as one of your 5 a day but limit them to one a day. When fruit is processed, e.g. blended, the fruit releases more sugars than if you were to eat raw. They can also be acidic which can cause problems for your teeth.
  • Squash try to choose no added sugar or sugar free options, again this will protect your family’s teeth.
  • Milk is great for providing us with vitamins, protein and calcium – we need calcium for healthy teeth and bones. Opt for semi-skimmed or skimmed milk to lower the fat content. Children under 2 should drink full fat milk.
  • Tea/coffee count towards your daily fluid goals as long as you drink them in moderation.  Switch to decaffeinated versions where possible (I know the morning struggle is real!) Caffeine makes you urinate more, leaving you less hydrated! Fruit and herbal teas are good alternatives, (I know what you’re thinking ‘no-one ever solved their problems over a cup of strawberry and chamomile’ but there are some lovely flavours out there!)
  • Fizzy drinks often contain caffeine and sugar. Limit your intake and pick low sugar and caffeine free versions where possible.
  • Alcohol Sorry everyone – that G & T doesn’t count towards your daily fluid intake! Alcohol can dehydrate you…hands up who’s been out for a couple of drinks and walked their 10,000 steps just going back and forwards to the toilet?

Please drink responsibly: in the heat we can often drink quicker than we intend to.

I’ve never been dehydrated surely, I’m ok?

  • Dehydration may not make us feel ill
  • Thirst is usually the first sign
  • We may urinate less and urine may be darker (A well-hydrated person will have light coloured urine)
  • Other signs of dehydration are headaches, feeling tired or dizzy, dry mouth/lips or cramps.

 

What about my children?

Children are more likely to become dehydrated. Children should aim to drink about 6-8 glasses of fluid a day. Water is the best drink for children. Try to encourage your children to have drinks with meals, get them to have extra drinks if being physically active and make sure to pack water in their school bag.

Dehydration can be serious so make sure to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, especially during these hotter months. Pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions may need to drink more fluids than normal so please check with your GP.

Stay healthy,

Leanne x

 

 

 

 

 

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

We should be making an effort to stay hydrated every day, but it becomes particularly important in the heat, especially for children who are more likely to become dehydrated and may not recognise the signs of thirst straight away.

Hydration is key to health and wellbeing – are you making sure you’re drinking enough?

Why do I need to drink? I don’t feel thirsty.

For a start, water makes up approximately 2/3 of our body and it helps us to function properly. Water helps the body to remove waste products, keeps the skin looking good, controls temperature and lubricates the joints. It can also aid concentration levels.

Ok, so I need fluid. What should I be drinking and how much?

Adults need approximately 1.5-2 litres a day. The best way to hit your fluid intake is by drinking good old-fashioned water. It’s easily accessible, fat, calorie and sugar free – winner! You can also get your daily fluid intake from:

 

  • Flavoured Water if you find plain water boring, try adding fruit e.g. lemon/lime/orange. [A nice combination is slices of orange and sprigs of rosemary.]
  • Tap water is fine to drink, there is no need to buy bottled water in this country.
  • Fruit juices/smoothies also count as one of your 5 a day but limit them to one a day. When fruit is processed, e.g. blended, the fruit releases more sugars than if you were to eat raw. They can also be acidic which can cause problems for your teeth.
  • Squash try to choose no added sugar or sugar free options, again this will protect your family’s teeth.
  • Milk is great for providing us with vitamins, protein and calcium – we need calcium for healthy teeth and bones. Opt for semi-skimmed or skimmed milk to lower the fat content. Children under 2 should drink full fat milk.
  • Tea/coffee count towards your daily fluid goals as long as you drink them in moderation.  Switch to decaffeinated versions where possible (I know the morning struggle is real!) Caffeine makes you urinate more, leaving you less hydrated! Fruit and herbal teas are good alternatives, (I know what you’re thinking ‘no-one ever solved their problems over a cup of strawberry and chamomile’ but there are some lovely flavours out there!)
  • Fizzy drinks often contain caffeine and sugar. Limit your intake and pick low sugar and caffeine free versions where possible.
  • Alcohol Sorry everyone – that G & T doesn’t count towards your daily fluid intake! Alcohol can dehydrate you…hands up who’s been out for a couple of drinks and walked their 10,000 steps just going back and forwards to the toilet?

Please drink responsibly: in the heat we can often drink quicker than we intend to.

I’ve never been dehydrated surely, I’m ok?

  • Dehydration may not make us feel ill
  • Thirst is usually the first sign
  • We may urinate less and urine may be darker (A well-hydrated person will have light coloured urine)
  • Other signs of dehydration are headaches, feeling tired or dizzy, dry mouth/lips or cramps.

 

What about my children?

Children are more likely to become dehydrated. Children should aim to drink about 6-8 glasses of fluid a day. Water is the best drink for children. Try to encourage your children to have drinks with meals, get them to have extra drinks if being physically active and make sure to pack water in their school bag.

Dehydration can be serious so make sure to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, especially during these hotter months. Pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions may need to drink more fluids than normal so please check with your GP.

Stay healthy,

Leanne x

 

 

 

 

 

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

We should be making an effort to stay hydrated every day, but it becomes particularly important in the heat, especially for children who are more likely to become dehydrated and may not recognise the signs of thirst straight away.

Hydration is key to health and wellbeing – are you making sure you’re drinking enough?

Why do I need to drink? I don’t feel thirsty.

For a start, water makes up approximately 2/3 of our body and it helps us to function properly. Water helps the body to remove waste products, keeps the skin looking good, controls temperature and lubricates the joints. It can also aid concentration levels.

Ok, so I need fluid. What should I be drinking and how much?

Adults need approximately 1.5-2 litres a day. The best way to hit your fluid intake is by drinking good old-fashioned water. It’s easily accessible, fat, calorie and sugar free – winner! You can also get your daily fluid intake from:

 

  • Flavoured Water if you find plain water boring, try adding fruit e.g. lemon/lime/orange. [A nice combination is slices of orange and sprigs of rosemary.]
  • Tap water is fine to drink, there is no need to buy bottled water in this country.
  • Fruit juices/smoothies also count as one of your 5 a day but limit them to one a day. When fruit is processed, e.g. blended, the fruit releases more sugars than if you were to eat raw. They can also be acidic which can cause problems for your teeth.
  • Squash try to choose no added sugar or sugar free options, again this will protect your family’s teeth.
  • Milk is great for providing us with vitamins, protein and calcium – we need calcium for healthy teeth and bones. Opt for semi-skimmed or skimmed milk to lower the fat content. Children under 2 should drink full fat milk.
  • Tea/coffee count towards your daily fluid goals as long as you drink them in moderation.  Switch to decaffeinated versions where possible (I know the morning struggle is real!) Caffeine makes you urinate more, leaving you less hydrated! Fruit and herbal teas are good alternatives, (I know what you’re thinking ‘no-one ever solved their problems over a cup of strawberry and chamomile’ but there are some lovely flavours out there!)
  • Fizzy drinks often contain caffeine and sugar. Limit your intake and pick low sugar and caffeine free versions where possible.
  • Alcohol Sorry everyone – that G & T doesn’t count towards your daily fluid intake! Alcohol can dehydrate you…hands up who’s been out for a couple of drinks and walked their 10,000 steps just going back and forwards to the toilet?

Please drink responsibly: in the heat we can often drink quicker than we intend to.

I’ve never been dehydrated surely, I’m ok?

  • Dehydration may not make us feel ill
  • Thirst is usually the first sign
  • We may urinate less and urine may be darker (A well-hydrated person will have light coloured urine)
  • Other signs of dehydration are headaches, feeling tired or dizzy, dry mouth/lips or cramps.

 

What about my children?

Children are more likely to become dehydrated. Children should aim to drink about 6-8 glasses of fluid a day. Water is the best drink for children. Try to encourage your children to have drinks with meals, get them to have extra drinks if being physically active and make sure to pack water in their school bag.

Dehydration can be serious so make sure to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, especially during these hotter months. Pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions may need to drink more fluids than normal so please check with your GP.

Stay healthy,

Leanne x

 

 

 

 

 

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

We should be making an effort to stay hydrated every day, but it becomes particularly important in the heat, especially for children who are more likely to become dehydrated and may not recognise the signs of thirst straight away.

Hydration is key to health and wellbeing – are you making sure you’re drinking enough?

Why do I need to drink? I don’t feel thirsty.

For a start, water makes up approximately 2/3 of our body and it helps us to function properly. Water helps the body to remove waste products, keeps the skin looking good, controls temperature and lubricates the joints. It can also aid concentration levels.

Ok, so I need fluid. What should I be drinking and how much?

Adults need approximately 1.5-2 litres a day. The best way to hit your fluid intake is by drinking good old-fashioned water. It’s easily accessible, fat, calorie and sugar free – winner! You can also get your daily fluid intake from:

 

  • Flavoured Water if you find plain water boring, try adding fruit e.g. lemon/lime/orange. [A nice combination is slices of orange and sprigs of rosemary.]
  • Tap water is fine to drink, there is no need to buy bottled water in this country.
  • Fruit juices/smoothies also count as one of your 5 a day but limit them to one a day. When fruit is processed, e.g. blended, the fruit releases more sugars than if you were to eat raw. They can also be acidic which can cause problems for your teeth.
  • Squash try to choose no added sugar or sugar free options, again this will protect your family’s teeth.
  • Milk is great for providing us with vitamins, protein and calcium – we need calcium for healthy teeth and bones. Opt for semi-skimmed or skimmed milk to lower the fat content. Children under 2 should drink full fat milk.
  • Tea/coffee count towards your daily fluid goals as long as you drink them in moderation.  Switch to decaffeinated versions where possible (I know the morning struggle is real!) Caffeine makes you urinate more, leaving you less hydrated! Fruit and herbal teas are good alternatives, (I know what you’re thinking ‘no-one ever solved their problems over a cup of strawberry and chamomile’ but there are some lovely flavours out there!)
  • Fizzy drinks often contain caffeine and sugar. Limit your intake and pick low sugar and caffeine free versions where possible.
  • Alcohol Sorry everyone – that G & T doesn’t count towards your daily fluid intake! Alcohol can dehydrate you…hands up who’s been out for a couple of drinks and walked their 10,000 steps just going back and forwards to the toilet?

Please drink responsibly: in the heat we can often drink quicker than we intend to.

I’ve never been dehydrated surely, I’m ok?

  • Dehydration may not make us feel ill
  • Thirst is usually the first sign
  • We may urinate less and urine may be darker (A well-hydrated person will have light coloured urine)
  • Other signs of dehydration are headaches, feeling tired or dizzy, dry mouth/lips or cramps.

 

What about my children?

Children are more likely to become dehydrated. Children should aim to drink about 6-8 glasses of fluid a day. Water is the best drink for children. Try to encourage your children to have drinks with meals, get them to have extra drinks if being physically active and make sure to pack water in their school bag.

Dehydration can be serious so make sure to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, especially during these hotter months. Pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions may need to drink more fluids than normal so please check with your GP.

Stay healthy,

Leanne x

 

 

 

 

 

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

We should be making an effort to stay hydrated every day, but it becomes particularly important in the heat, especially for children who are more likely to become dehydrated and may not recognise the signs of thirst straight away.

Hydration is key to health and wellbeing – are you making sure you’re drinking enough?

Why do I need to drink? I don’t feel thirsty.

For a start, water makes up approximately 2/3 of our body and it helps us to function properly. Water helps the body to remove waste products, keeps the skin looking good, controls temperature and lubricates the joints. It can also aid concentration levels.

Ok, so I need fluid. What should I be drinking and how much?

Adults need approximately 1.5-2 litres a day. The best way to hit your fluid intake is by drinking good old-fashioned water. It’s easily accessible, fat, calorie and sugar free – winner! You can also get your daily fluid intake from:

 

  • Flavoured Water if you find plain water boring, try adding fruit e.g. lemon/lime/orange. [A nice combination is slices of orange and sprigs of rosemary.]
  • Tap water is fine to drink, there is no need to buy bottled water in this country.
  • Fruit juices/smoothies also count as one of your 5 a day but limit them to one a day. When fruit is processed, e.g. blended, the fruit releases more sugars than if you were to eat raw. They can also be acidic which can cause problems for your teeth.
  • Squash try to choose no added sugar or sugar free options, again this will protect your family’s teeth.
  • Milk is great for providing us with vitamins, protein and calcium – we need calcium for healthy teeth and bones. Opt for semi-skimmed or skimmed milk to lower the fat content. Children under 2 should drink full fat milk.
  • Tea/coffee count towards your daily fluid goals as long as you drink them in moderation.  Switch to decaffeinated versions where possible (I know the morning struggle is real!) Caffeine makes you urinate more, leaving you less hydrated! Fruit and herbal teas are good alternatives, (I know what you’re thinking ‘no-one ever solved their problems over a cup of strawberry and chamomile’ but there are some lovely flavours out there!)
  • Fizzy drinks often contain caffeine and sugar. Limit your intake and pick low sugar and caffeine free versions where possible.
  • Alcohol Sorry everyone – that G & T doesn’t count towards your daily fluid intake! Alcohol can dehydrate you…hands up who’s been out for a couple of drinks and walked their 10,000 steps just going back and forwards to the toilet?

Please drink responsibly: in the heat we can often drink quicker than we intend to.

I’ve never been dehydrated surely, I’m ok?

  • Dehydration may not make us feel ill
  • Thirst is usually the first sign
  • We may urinate less and urine may be darker (A well-hydrated person will have light coloured urine)
  • Other signs of dehydration are headaches, feeling tired or dizzy, dry mouth/lips or cramps.

 

What about my children?

Children are more likely to become dehydrated. Children should aim to drink about 6-8 glasses of fluid a day. Water is the best drink for children. Try to encourage your children to have drinks with meals, get them to have extra drinks if being physically active and make sure to pack water in their school bag.

Dehydration can be serious so make sure to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, especially during these hotter months. Pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions may need to drink more fluids than normal so please check with your GP.

Stay healthy,

Leanne x

 

 

 

 

 

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

We should be making an effort to stay hydrated every day, but it becomes particularly important in the heat, especially for children who are more likely to become dehydrated and may not recognise the signs of thirst straight away.

Hydration is key to health and wellbeing – are you making sure you’re drinking enough?

Why do I need to drink? I don’t feel thirsty.

For a start, water makes up approximately 2/3 of our body and it helps us to function properly. Water helps the body to remove waste products, keeps the skin looking good, controls temperature and lubricates the joints. It can also aid concentration levels.

Ok, so I need fluid. What should I be drinking and how much?

Adults need approximately 1.5-2 litres a day. The best way to hit your fluid intake is by drinking good old-fashioned water. It’s easily accessible, fat, calorie and sugar free – winner! You can also get your daily fluid intake from:

 

  • Flavoured Water if you find plain water boring, try adding fruit e.g. lemon/lime/orange. [A nice combination is slices of orange and sprigs of rosemary.]
  • Tap water is fine to drink, there is no need to buy bottled water in this country.
  • Fruit juices/smoothies also count as one of your 5 a day but limit them to one a day. When fruit is processed, e.g. blended, the fruit releases more sugars than if you were to eat raw. They can also be acidic which can cause problems for your teeth.
  • Squash try to choose no added sugar or sugar free options, again this will protect your family’s teeth.
  • Milk is great for providing us with vitamins, protein and calcium – we need calcium for healthy teeth and bones. Opt for semi-skimmed or skimmed milk to lower the fat content. Children under 2 should drink full fat milk.
  • Tea/coffee count towards your daily fluid goals as long as you drink them in moderation.  Switch to decaffeinated versions where possible (I know the morning struggle is real!) Caffeine makes you urinate more, leaving you less hydrated! Fruit and herbal teas are good alternatives, (I know what you’re thinking ‘no-one ever solved their problems over a cup of strawberry and chamomile’ but there are some lovely flavours out there!)
  • Fizzy drinks often contain caffeine and sugar. Limit your intake and pick low sugar and caffeine free versions where possible.
  • Alcohol Sorry everyone – that G & T doesn’t count towards your daily fluid intake! Alcohol can dehydrate you…hands up who’s been out for a couple of drinks and walked their 10,000 steps just going back and forwards to the toilet?

Please drink responsibly: in the heat we can often drink quicker than we intend to.

I’ve never been dehydrated surely, I’m ok?

  • Dehydration may not make us feel ill
  • Thirst is usually the first sign
  • We may urinate less and urine may be darker (A well-hydrated person will have light coloured urine)
  • Other signs of dehydration are headaches, feeling tired or dizzy, dry mouth/lips or cramps.

 

What about my children?

Children are more likely to become dehydrated. Children should aim to drink about 6-8 glasses of fluid a day. Water is the best drink for children. Try to encourage your children to have drinks with meals, get them to have extra drinks if being physically active and make sure to pack water in their school bag.

Dehydration can be serious so make sure to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, especially during these hotter months. Pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions may need to drink more fluids than normal so please check with your GP.

Stay healthy,

Leanne x

 

 

 

 

 

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

We should be making an effort to stay hydrated every day, but it becomes particularly important in the heat, especially for children who are more likely to become dehydrated and may not recognise the signs of thirst straight away.

Hydration is key to health and wellbeing – are you making sure you’re drinking enough?

Why do I need to drink? I don’t feel thirsty.

For a start, water makes up approximately 2/3 of our body and it helps us to function properly. Water helps the body to remove waste products, keeps the skin looking good, controls temperature and lubricates the joints. It can also aid concentration levels.

Ok, so I need fluid. What should I be drinking and how much?

Adults need approximately 1.5-2 litres a day. The best way to hit your fluid intake is by drinking good old-fashioned water. It’s easily accessible, fat, calorie and sugar free – winner! You can also get your daily fluid intake from:

 

  • Flavoured Water if you find plain water boring, try adding fruit e.g. lemon/lime/orange. [A nice combination is slices of orange and sprigs of rosemary.]
  • Tap water is fine to drink, there is no need to buy bottled water in this country.
  • Fruit juices/smoothies also count as one of your 5 a day but limit them to one a day. When fruit is processed, e.g. blended, the fruit releases more sugars than if you were to eat raw. They can also be acidic which can cause problems for your teeth.
  • Squash try to choose no added sugar or sugar free options, again this will protect your family’s teeth.
  • Milk is great for providing us with vitamins, protein and calcium – we need calcium for healthy teeth and bones. Opt for semi-skimmed or skimmed milk to lower the fat content. Children under 2 should drink full fat milk.
  • Tea/coffee count towards your daily fluid goals as long as you drink them in moderation.  Switch to decaffeinated versions where possible (I know the morning struggle is real!) Caffeine makes you urinate more, leaving you less hydrated! Fruit and herbal teas are good alternatives, (I know what you’re thinking ‘no-one ever solved their problems over a cup of strawberry and chamomile’ but there are some lovely flavours out there!)
  • Fizzy drinks often contain caffeine and sugar. Limit your intake and pick low sugar and caffeine free versions where possible.
  • Alcohol Sorry everyone – that G & T doesn’t count towards your daily fluid intake! Alcohol can dehydrate you…hands up who’s been out for a couple of drinks and walked their 10,000 steps just going back and forwards to the toilet?

Please drink responsibly: in the heat we can often drink quicker than we intend to.

I’ve never been dehydrated surely, I’m ok?

  • Dehydration may not make us feel ill
  • Thirst is usually the first sign
  • We may urinate less and urine may be darker (A well-hydrated person will have light coloured urine)
  • Other signs of dehydration are headaches, feeling tired or dizzy, dry mouth/lips or cramps.

 

What about my children?

Children are more likely to become dehydrated. Children should aim to drink about 6-8 glasses of fluid a day. Water is the best drink for children. Try to encourage your children to have drinks with meals, get them to have extra drinks if being physically active and make sure to pack water in their school bag.

Dehydration can be serious so make sure to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, especially during these hotter months. Pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions may need to drink more fluids than normal so please check with your GP.

Stay healthy,

Leanne x

 

 

 

 

 

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

We should be making an effort to stay hydrated every day, but it becomes particularly important in the heat, especially for children who are more likely to become dehydrated and may not recognise the signs of thirst straight away.

Hydration is key to health and wellbeing – are you making sure you’re drinking enough?

Why do I need to drink? I don’t feel thirsty.

For a start, water makes up approximately 2/3 of our body and it helps us to function properly. Water helps the body to remove waste products, keeps the skin looking good, controls temperature and lubricates the joints. It can also aid concentration levels.

Ok, so I need fluid. What should I be drinking and how much?

Adults need approximately 1.5-2 litres a day. The best way to hit your fluid intake is by drinking good old-fashioned water. It’s easily accessible, fat, calorie and sugar free – winner! You can also get your daily fluid intake from:

 

  • Flavoured Water if you find plain water boring, try adding fruit e.g. lemon/lime/orange. [A nice combination is slices of orange and sprigs of rosemary.]
  • Tap water is fine to drink, there is no need to buy bottled water in this country.
  • Fruit juices/smoothies also count as one of your 5 a day but limit them to one a day. When fruit is processed, e.g. blended, the fruit releases more sugars than if you were to eat raw. They can also be acidic which can cause problems for your teeth.
  • Squash try to choose no added sugar or sugar free options, again this will protect your family’s teeth.
  • Milk is great for providing us with vitamins, protein and calcium – we need calcium for healthy teeth and bones. Opt for semi-skimmed or skimmed milk to lower the fat content. Children under 2 should drink full fat milk.
  • Tea/coffee count towards your daily fluid goals as long as you drink them in moderation.  Switch to decaffeinated versions where possible (I know the morning struggle is real!) Caffeine makes you urinate more, leaving you less hydrated! Fruit and herbal teas are good alternatives, (I know what you’re thinking ‘no-one ever solved their problems over a cup of strawberry and chamomile’ but there are some lovely flavours out there!)
  • Fizzy drinks often contain caffeine and sugar. Limit your intake and pick low sugar and caffeine free versions where possible.
  • Alcohol Sorry everyone – that G & T doesn’t count towards your daily fluid intake! Alcohol can dehydrate you…hands up who’s been out for a couple of drinks and walked their 10,000 steps just going back and forwards to the toilet?

Please drink responsibly: in the heat we can often drink quicker than we intend to.

I’ve never been dehydrated surely, I’m ok?

  • Dehydration may not make us feel ill
  • Thirst is usually the first sign
  • We may urinate less and urine may be darker (A well-hydrated person will have light coloured urine)
  • Other signs of dehydration are headaches, feeling tired or dizzy, dry mouth/lips or cramps.

 

What about my children?

Children are more likely to become dehydrated. Children should aim to drink about 6-8 glasses of fluid a day. Water is the best drink for children. Try to encourage your children to have drinks with meals, get them to have extra drinks if being physically active and make sure to pack water in their school bag.

Dehydration can be serious so make sure to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, especially during these hotter months. Pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions may need to drink more fluids than normal so please check with your GP.

Stay healthy,

Leanne x

 

 

 

 

 

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

We should be making an effort to stay hydrated every day, but it becomes particularly important in the heat, especially for children who are more likely to become dehydrated and may not recognise the signs of thirst straight away.

Hydration is key to health and wellbeing – are you making sure you’re drinking enough?

Why do I need to drink? I don’t feel thirsty.

For a start, water makes up approximately 2/3 of our body and it helps us to function properly. Water helps the body to remove waste products, keeps the skin looking good, controls temperature and lubricates the joints. It can also aid concentration levels.

Ok, so I need fluid. What should I be drinking and how much?

Adults need approximately 1.5-2 litres a day. The best way to hit your fluid intake is by drinking good old-fashioned water. It’s easily accessible, fat, calorie and sugar free – winner! You can also get your daily fluid intake from:

 

  • Flavoured Water if you find plain water boring, try adding fruit e.g. lemon/lime/orange. [A nice combination is slices of orange and sprigs of rosemary.]
  • Tap water is fine to drink, there is no need to buy bottled water in this country.
  • Fruit juices/smoothies also count as one of your 5 a day but limit them to one a day. When fruit is processed, e.g. blended, the fruit releases more sugars than if you were to eat raw. They can also be acidic which can cause problems for your teeth.
  • Squash try to choose no added sugar or sugar free options, again this will protect your family’s teeth.
  • Milk is great for providing us with vitamins, protein and calcium – we need calcium for healthy teeth and bones. Opt for semi-skimmed or skimmed milk to lower the fat content. Children under 2 should drink full fat milk.
  • Tea/coffee count towards your daily fluid goals as long as you drink them in moderation.  Switch to decaffeinated versions where possible (I know the morning struggle is real!) Caffeine makes you urinate more, leaving you less hydrated! Fruit and herbal teas are good alternatives, (I know what you’re thinking ‘no-one ever solved their problems over a cup of strawberry and chamomile’ but there are some lovely flavours out there!)
  • Fizzy drinks often contain caffeine and sugar. Limit your intake and pick low sugar and caffeine free versions where possible.
  • Alcohol Sorry everyone – that G & T doesn’t count towards your daily fluid intake! Alcohol can dehydrate you…hands up who’s been out for a couple of drinks and walked their 10,000 steps just going back and forwards to the toilet?

Please drink responsibly: in the heat we can often drink quicker than we intend to.

I’ve never been dehydrated surely, I’m ok?

  • Dehydration may not make us feel ill
  • Thirst is usually the first sign
  • We may urinate less and urine may be darker (A well-hydrated person will have light coloured urine)
  • Other signs of dehydration are headaches, feeling tired or dizzy, dry mouth/lips or cramps.

 

What about my children?

Children are more likely to become dehydrated. Children should aim to drink about 6-8 glasses of fluid a day. Water is the best drink for children. Try to encourage your children to have drinks with meals, get them to have extra drinks if being physically active and make sure to pack water in their school bag.

Dehydration can be serious so make sure to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, especially during these hotter months. Pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions may need to drink more fluids than normal so please check with your GP.

Stay healthy,

Leanne x

 

 

 

 

 

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

We should be making an effort to stay hydrated every day, but it becomes particularly important in the heat, especially for children who are more likely to become dehydrated and may not recognise the signs of thirst straight away.

Hydration is key to health and wellbeing – are you making sure you’re drinking enough?

Why do I need to drink? I don’t feel thirsty.

For a start, water makes up approximately 2/3 of our body and it helps us to function properly. Water helps the body to remove waste products, keeps the skin looking good, controls temperature and lubricates the joints. It can also aid concentration levels.

Ok, so I need fluid. What should I be drinking and how much?

Adults need approximately 1.5-2 litres a day. The best way to hit your fluid intake is by drinking good old-fashioned water. It’s easily accessible, fat, calorie and sugar free – winner! You can also get your daily fluid intake from:

 

  • Flavoured Water if you find plain water boring, try adding fruit e.g. lemon/lime/orange. [A nice combination is slices of orange and sprigs of rosemary.]
  • Tap water is fine to drink, there is no need to buy bottled water in this country.
  • Fruit juices/smoothies also count as one of your 5 a day but limit them to one a day. When fruit is processed, e.g. blended, the fruit releases more sugars than if you were to eat raw. They can also be acidic which can cause problems for your teeth.
  • Squash try to choose no added sugar or sugar free options, again this will protect your family’s teeth.
  • Milk is great for providing us with vitamins, protein and calcium – we need calcium for healthy teeth and bones. Opt for semi-skimmed or skimmed milk to lower the fat content. Children under 2 should drink full fat milk.
  • Tea/coffee count towards your daily fluid goals as long as you drink them in moderation.  Switch to decaffeinated versions where possible (I know the morning struggle is real!) Caffeine makes you urinate more, leaving you less hydrated! Fruit and herbal teas are good alternatives, (I know what you’re thinking ‘no-one ever solved their problems over a cup of strawberry and chamomile’ but there are some lovely flavours out there!)
  • Fizzy drinks often contain caffeine and sugar. Limit your intake and pick low sugar and caffeine free versions where possible.
  • Alcohol Sorry everyone – that G & T doesn’t count towards your daily fluid intake! Alcohol can dehydrate you…hands up who’s been out for a couple of drinks and walked their 10,000 steps just going back and forwards to the toilet?

Please drink responsibly: in the heat we can often drink quicker than we intend to.

I’ve never been dehydrated surely, I’m ok?

  • Dehydration may not make us feel ill
  • Thirst is usually the first sign
  • We may urinate less and urine may be darker (A well-hydrated person will have light coloured urine)
  • Other signs of dehydration are headaches, feeling tired or dizzy, dry mouth/lips or cramps.

 

What about my children?

Children are more likely to become dehydrated. Children should aim to drink about 6-8 glasses of fluid a day. Water is the best drink for children. Try to encourage your children to have drinks with meals, get them to have extra drinks if being physically active and make sure to pack water in their school bag.

Dehydration can be serious so make sure to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, especially during these hotter months. Pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions may need to drink more fluids than normal so please check with your GP.

Stay healthy,

Leanne x

 

 

 

 

 


The course is limited to 12 places.

Please email vanessavaroujian@therapypartners.co.uk for more information, or to register your place.

 


 

Wayne Farrell

Wayne Farrell

ICF certified NLP trainer

Wayne Farrell, has the great pleasure and wonderful opportunity to travel the world in the pursuit of mastery. He is fortunate to deliver various types of training in various countries and is passionate in helping you, to become the best you can be.

Some of his credentials include:
ICF Certified Coach,
ICF Mentor Coach,
Micro Expression and Body Language trainer,
Trainer of NLP, Hypnosis, Coaching, Time Line Therapy®, Speed reading and other personal development courses.


 

Therapy Partners

Therapy Partners

We are a group of therapists and Doctors working together and our concept is modelled like a GP’s Practice, where all of the  Therapists and Doctors  are individual practitioners, and each has particular ways of working and special interests tailored to suit your needs, we work online or over the phone at a time to suit you. We can also offer some face to face sessions in both London and Kent.

The original concept of “on demand therapy” using the latest communication technology and the ideas for the website were created by Al Heyes Therapy Partners Founder and Dave Woodward – two therapists, seeing the need make therapy easier to access across the globe and their thoughts were put into reasonable order online by Ackniculous.com.

Our beliefs: We believe that therapy should be accessible to all who need it. We believe that people should have the right to choose who they see and when. We believe that therapy should be available when you want it, where you want it using the best new technology available.  We also believe in supporting therapists to work and undertake continuing professional development in the most flexible way possible.

 


This is a sponsored post.

If you are interested in using the services of Therapy Partners or registering for their NLP Intensive Life Coaching Course, please contact them directly.

Interested in sponsoring a post yourself? For more information and prices, please email our Sales Team

 

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