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The Infant Fiefdom

 

My latest blog could be seen as somewhat controversial, but I hope it is read as it is intended, with an air of irritation and deep-seated concern for our young people and the troubling state of our society. It is also meant to be thought-provoking and not antagonistic. I am shocked that I find myself so frustrated that this has even become a problem that needs to be addressed at all. I would never bring it up to people because, well how can you broach it without making someone feel bad or judged? I feel passionate about this but I appreciate that there is no simple solution, people need to be open to change. So what is ‘it’?   For us to stop being selfish and consider those around us more. 

Although I am a driver, I use public transport a lot. I don’t mind it, I like the way I can sit down with a book, or people-watch and in no time at all (hopefully! I’ll save the fiasco of my journey home from a recent trip to Devon for another time…) I have reached my destination. Calm and relaxed. The majority of other users are polite and respectful, minding their own business and I reciprocate that. I keep myself to myself and try my best to be considerate to others.

What irritates and ruins my journey (but not my day) is the disrespect of families with children towards other passengers. For multiple reasons really, but mainly because very few show consideration for other travelers and allow their little cherubs (some really are adorable and no bother) to travel like the bus, carriage, tram etc are their miniature fiefdoms. Throwing food, taking up seats without offering them to travelers (much older than me), putting their dirty feet all over said seats and otherwise not sitting nicely or quietly.

Notice, I do not say ‘silently’ – I do not agree with the antiquated idea that ‘Children should be seen and not heard.’ Far from it in fact, but I firmly believe that we should not pander to their every whim, that they should be taught respect for others (as families expect for them and can be quite vocal about at times) and that they should not be privy to adult conversations… that’s right, I believe that they should be allowed to be children. Blissfully unaware of the tribulations of adulthood. With the security of boundaries so that they know their place in the world and that it changes as we grow up and are responsible for our own decisions. As children, they are not responsible for their behaviour, that falls to their parents.

But, my biggest bugbear of traveling with families is…you guessed it, technology, but probably not in the way you’d think. I have never hidden my views about plonking our impressionable young people in front of a tablet or mobile phone for extended periods or using technology as a behaviour management tool. I believe it to be very damaging for their development, social, emotional, physical and well pretty much every way actually, and I am not alone in this. I understand ‘times have changed’, but I’m sorry to say I look at it as a touch of lazy parenting – because it is the easy solution… but it creates as many as it fixes.

Read a book, divert their attention using their imagination or tangible things, or, you know, start a conversation…or suck it up and allow them to express themselves through a tantrum… heaven knows it’s the only time it’s socially acceptable to prostrate oneself on the floor and scream about the harshness of the world and how it doesn’t make sense. Dulling their senses is not the way. It was okay for my generation and many who preceded mine!

As a passenger, I expect to hear children chattering, laughing, crying and throwing the occasional tantrum. They are children. I am referring to the sounds from the devices they are using.
(On a side note, I guess blogs are the closest thing to a ‘grown-up’ tantrum, but they have to be thought out and reasoned…alas!)

I digress. I appreciate that not everything digital is mind-numbing. Some of it is educational and entertaining for children. If you really must shove a screen (of any size) under your child’s nose and your family has decided that it is the right way for your unit, then, by all means, fill your boots. But please, for the love of all that is holy, PURCHASE SOME HEADPHONES TO COMPLETE THE SET!


There are volume limited ones they can use like the ones below, but if your reason for not using them is that it could damage Sophie’s hearing, little Johnny won’t keep them on or Izzy doesn’t like them, then perhaps you may like to question whether they should be using the technology at all. Their eyesight is being compromised already and introducing headphones may help you to limit their usage time.
“Okay Harry you can watch this [on the train], if you wear the headphones. If you take them off, it will mean you have had enough screen time for now.”

If you are worried about possible ear infections, the external ones are much better for little one’s ears because they do not sit inside and trap bacteria. That being said the ones that resemble ear muffs do make little ears and heads quite warm, so usage needs to be restricted to short spells so that the warmth doesn’t become a breeding ground for harmful bacteria and bugs in the ear canal. Another good excuse to limit time.

I appreciate that this is difficult and that everybody parents differently, but what is not fair is the way that what you choose spills out and has an impact on everybody else – who have paid a lot of money for their travel and do not deserve to be stuck in a war of tablet noise.

It is not teenagers who make the noise on public transport. The poor blighters are so consumed by hormones and finding their way that they communicate in mono-syllabic grunts, they sure do not wish to share anything with you, let alone their music or whatever they are hammering into their ear canals. This is a fact, I’ve looked around the carriages and repeatedly seen young people with their headphones in, huddled trying to avoid eye contact with everyone. Their parents taught them to give up their seats, that it is okay to be bored, that you may not like something but it’s tough.

So I’d like to round my blog up with a warm Thank You! to the teenage generation for their consideration and respect. On many of the journeys I referenced above, I saw young people offer their seats to older people or those with mobility issues, (whilst families left their young children occupying seats not on a lap), and one young lad even gave his chocolate bar to the stranger sat beside him because their sugar levels had dropped. It was beautiful. None of the actions were done begrudgingly but as kindnesses for fellow humans who may have a greater need. Our young people get a lot of negative press and I believe the majority is undeserved. Each generation has good and bad within it, yes everyone has had an older person be rude to us and we’ve been miffed because of it, but at the end of the day we’re all still learning and navigating this mad journey called life.

It is my hope that if we all remember to mindful of those around us, the rift in our society generation to generation will heal. Strangers will be kind to one another again. This can be as simple as taking into account that the person next to us may need silence, or wish to talk to us, may not want to hear our music or smell our particularly smelly food, there may be someone who needs our seat more than us or who is willing to give their seat up for us. Not everything is about you. Sometimes we forget that. Consideration and kindness do not hurt, they do not cost us anything. If take time for those who have walked before us, that may have the knowledge to impart to us or a story to tell then we will grow that bit taller and wiser ourselves. Everyone matters and has a story to tell, I just hope our newest generation aren’t missing out on that because of technology. That’s my hope anyway… kindness and consideration away from a screen.

 

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

We should be making an effort to stay hydrated every day, but it becomes particularly important in the heat, especially for children who are more likely to become dehydrated and may not recognise the signs of thirst straight away.

Hydration is key to health and wellbeing – are you making sure you’re drinking enough?

Why do I need to drink? I don’t feel thirsty.

For a start, water makes up approximately 2/3 of our body and it helps us to function properly. Water helps the body to remove waste products, keeps the skin looking good, controls temperature and lubricates the joints. It can also aid concentration levels.

Ok, so I need fluid. What should I be drinking and how much?

Adults need approximately 1.5-2 litres a day. The best way to hit your fluid intake is by drinking good old-fashioned water. It’s easily accessible, fat, calorie and sugar free – winner! You can also get your daily fluid intake from:

 

  • Flavoured Water if you find plain water boring, try adding fruit e.g. lemon/lime/orange. [A nice combination is slices of orange and sprigs of rosemary.]
  • Tap water is fine to drink, there is no need to buy bottled water in this country.
  • Fruit juices/smoothies also count as one of your 5 a day but limit them to one a day. When fruit is processed, e.g. blended, the fruit releases more sugars than if you were to eat raw. They can also be acidic which can cause problems for your teeth.
  • Squash try to choose no added sugar or sugar free options, again this will protect your family’s teeth.
  • Milk is great for providing us with vitamins, protein and calcium – we need calcium for healthy teeth and bones. Opt for semi-skimmed or skimmed milk to lower the fat content. Children under 2 should drink full fat milk.
  • Tea/coffee count towards your daily fluid goals as long as you drink them in moderation.  Switch to decaffeinated versions where possible (I know the morning struggle is real!) Caffeine makes you urinate more, leaving you less hydrated! Fruit and herbal teas are good alternatives, (I know what you’re thinking ‘no-one ever solved their problems over a cup of strawberry and chamomile’ but there are some lovely flavours out there!)
  • Fizzy drinks often contain caffeine and sugar. Limit your intake and pick low sugar and caffeine free versions where possible.
  • Alcohol Sorry everyone – that G & T doesn’t count towards your daily fluid intake! Alcohol can dehydrate you…hands up who’s been out for a couple of drinks and walked their 10,000 steps just going back and forwards to the toilet?

Please drink responsibly: in the heat we can often drink quicker than we intend to.

I’ve never been dehydrated surely, I’m ok?

  • Dehydration may not make us feel ill
  • Thirst is usually the first sign
  • We may urinate less and urine may be darker (A well-hydrated person will have light coloured urine)
  • Other signs of dehydration are headaches, feeling tired or dizzy, dry mouth/lips or cramps.

 

What about my children?

Children are more likely to become dehydrated. Children should aim to drink about 6-8 glasses of fluid a day. Water is the best drink for children. Try to encourage your children to have drinks with meals, get them to have extra drinks if being physically active and make sure to pack water in their school bag.

Dehydration can be serious so make sure to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, especially during these hotter months. Pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions may need to drink more fluids than normal so please check with your GP.

Stay healthy,

Leanne x

 

 

 

 

 

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

We should be making an effort to stay hydrated every day, but it becomes particularly important in the heat, especially for children who are more likely to become dehydrated and may not recognise the signs of thirst straight away.

Hydration is key to health and wellbeing – are you making sure you’re drinking enough?

Why do I need to drink? I don’t feel thirsty.

For a start, water makes up approximately 2/3 of our body and it helps us to function properly. Water helps the body to remove waste products, keeps the skin looking good, controls temperature and lubricates the joints. It can also aid concentration levels.

Ok, so I need fluid. What should I be drinking and how much?

Adults need approximately 1.5-2 litres a day. The best way to hit your fluid intake is by drinking good old-fashioned water. It’s easily accessible, fat, calorie and sugar free – winner! You can also get your daily fluid intake from:

 

  • Flavoured Water if you find plain water boring, try adding fruit e.g. lemon/lime/orange. [A nice combination is slices of orange and sprigs of rosemary.]
  • Tap water is fine to drink, there is no need to buy bottled water in this country.
  • Fruit juices/smoothies also count as one of your 5 a day but limit them to one a day. When fruit is processed, e.g. blended, the fruit releases more sugars than if you were to eat raw. They can also be acidic which can cause problems for your teeth.
  • Squash try to choose no added sugar or sugar free options, again this will protect your family’s teeth.
  • Milk is great for providing us with vitamins, protein and calcium – we need calcium for healthy teeth and bones. Opt for semi-skimmed or skimmed milk to lower the fat content. Children under 2 should drink full fat milk.
  • Tea/coffee count towards your daily fluid goals as long as you drink them in moderation.  Switch to decaffeinated versions where possible (I know the morning struggle is real!) Caffeine makes you urinate more, leaving you less hydrated! Fruit and herbal teas are good alternatives, (I know what you’re thinking ‘no-one ever solved their problems over a cup of strawberry and chamomile’ but there are some lovely flavours out there!)
  • Fizzy drinks often contain caffeine and sugar. Limit your intake and pick low sugar and caffeine free versions where possible.
  • Alcohol Sorry everyone – that G & T doesn’t count towards your daily fluid intake! Alcohol can dehydrate you…hands up who’s been out for a couple of drinks and walked their 10,000 steps just going back and forwards to the toilet?

Please drink responsibly: in the heat we can often drink quicker than we intend to.

I’ve never been dehydrated surely, I’m ok?

  • Dehydration may not make us feel ill
  • Thirst is usually the first sign
  • We may urinate less and urine may be darker (A well-hydrated person will have light coloured urine)
  • Other signs of dehydration are headaches, feeling tired or dizzy, dry mouth/lips or cramps.

 

What about my children?

Children are more likely to become dehydrated. Children should aim to drink about 6-8 glasses of fluid a day. Water is the best drink for children. Try to encourage your children to have drinks with meals, get them to have extra drinks if being physically active and make sure to pack water in their school bag.

Dehydration can be serious so make sure to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, especially during these hotter months. Pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions may need to drink more fluids than normal so please check with your GP.

Stay healthy,

Leanne x

 

 

 

 

 

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

We should be making an effort to stay hydrated every day, but it becomes particularly important in the heat, especially for children who are more likely to become dehydrated and may not recognise the signs of thirst straight away.

Hydration is key to health and wellbeing – are you making sure you’re drinking enough?

Why do I need to drink? I don’t feel thirsty.

For a start, water makes up approximately 2/3 of our body and it helps us to function properly. Water helps the body to remove waste products, keeps the skin looking good, controls temperature and lubricates the joints. It can also aid concentration levels.

Ok, so I need fluid. What should I be drinking and how much?

Adults need approximately 1.5-2 litres a day. The best way to hit your fluid intake is by drinking good old-fashioned water. It’s easily accessible, fat, calorie and sugar free – winner! You can also get your daily fluid intake from:

 

  • Flavoured Water if you find plain water boring, try adding fruit e.g. lemon/lime/orange. [A nice combination is slices of orange and sprigs of rosemary.]
  • Tap water is fine to drink, there is no need to buy bottled water in this country.
  • Fruit juices/smoothies also count as one of your 5 a day but limit them to one a day. When fruit is processed, e.g. blended, the fruit releases more sugars than if you were to eat raw. They can also be acidic which can cause problems for your teeth.
  • Squash try to choose no added sugar or sugar free options, again this will protect your family’s teeth.
  • Milk is great for providing us with vitamins, protein and calcium – we need calcium for healthy teeth and bones. Opt for semi-skimmed or skimmed milk to lower the fat content. Children under 2 should drink full fat milk.
  • Tea/coffee count towards your daily fluid goals as long as you drink them in moderation.  Switch to decaffeinated versions where possible (I know the morning struggle is real!) Caffeine makes you urinate more, leaving you less hydrated! Fruit and herbal teas are good alternatives, (I know what you’re thinking ‘no-one ever solved their problems over a cup of strawberry and chamomile’ but there are some lovely flavours out there!)
  • Fizzy drinks often contain caffeine and sugar. Limit your intake and pick low sugar and caffeine free versions where possible.
  • Alcohol Sorry everyone – that G & T doesn’t count towards your daily fluid intake! Alcohol can dehydrate you…hands up who’s been out for a couple of drinks and walked their 10,000 steps just going back and forwards to the toilet?

Please drink responsibly: in the heat we can often drink quicker than we intend to.

I’ve never been dehydrated surely, I’m ok?

  • Dehydration may not make us feel ill
  • Thirst is usually the first sign
  • We may urinate less and urine may be darker (A well-hydrated person will have light coloured urine)
  • Other signs of dehydration are headaches, feeling tired or dizzy, dry mouth/lips or cramps.

 

What about my children?

Children are more likely to become dehydrated. Children should aim to drink about 6-8 glasses of fluid a day. Water is the best drink for children. Try to encourage your children to have drinks with meals, get them to have extra drinks if being physically active and make sure to pack water in their school bag.

Dehydration can be serious so make sure to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, especially during these hotter months. Pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions may need to drink more fluids than normal so please check with your GP.

Stay healthy,

Leanne x

 

 

 

 

 

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

We should be making an effort to stay hydrated every day, but it becomes particularly important in the heat, especially for children who are more likely to become dehydrated and may not recognise the signs of thirst straight away.

Hydration is key to health and wellbeing – are you making sure you’re drinking enough?

Why do I need to drink? I don’t feel thirsty.

For a start, water makes up approximately 2/3 of our body and it helps us to function properly. Water helps the body to remove waste products, keeps the skin looking good, controls temperature and lubricates the joints. It can also aid concentration levels.

Ok, so I need fluid. What should I be drinking and how much?

Adults need approximately 1.5-2 litres a day. The best way to hit your fluid intake is by drinking good old-fashioned water. It’s easily accessible, fat, calorie and sugar free – winner! You can also get your daily fluid intake from:

 

  • Flavoured Water if you find plain water boring, try adding fruit e.g. lemon/lime/orange. [A nice combination is slices of orange and sprigs of rosemary.]
  • Tap water is fine to drink, there is no need to buy bottled water in this country.
  • Fruit juices/smoothies also count as one of your 5 a day but limit them to one a day. When fruit is processed, e.g. blended, the fruit releases more sugars than if you were to eat raw. They can also be acidic which can cause problems for your teeth.
  • Squash try to choose no added sugar or sugar free options, again this will protect your family’s teeth.
  • Milk is great for providing us with vitamins, protein and calcium – we need calcium for healthy teeth and bones. Opt for semi-skimmed or skimmed milk to lower the fat content. Children under 2 should drink full fat milk.
  • Tea/coffee count towards your daily fluid goals as long as you drink them in moderation.  Switch to decaffeinated versions where possible (I know the morning struggle is real!) Caffeine makes you urinate more, leaving you less hydrated! Fruit and herbal teas are good alternatives, (I know what you’re thinking ‘no-one ever solved their problems over a cup of strawberry and chamomile’ but there are some lovely flavours out there!)
  • Fizzy drinks often contain caffeine and sugar. Limit your intake and pick low sugar and caffeine free versions where possible.
  • Alcohol Sorry everyone – that G & T doesn’t count towards your daily fluid intake! Alcohol can dehydrate you…hands up who’s been out for a couple of drinks and walked their 10,000 steps just going back and forwards to the toilet?

Please drink responsibly: in the heat we can often drink quicker than we intend to.

I’ve never been dehydrated surely, I’m ok?

  • Dehydration may not make us feel ill
  • Thirst is usually the first sign
  • We may urinate less and urine may be darker (A well-hydrated person will have light coloured urine)
  • Other signs of dehydration are headaches, feeling tired or dizzy, dry mouth/lips or cramps.

 

What about my children?

Children are more likely to become dehydrated. Children should aim to drink about 6-8 glasses of fluid a day. Water is the best drink for children. Try to encourage your children to have drinks with meals, get them to have extra drinks if being physically active and make sure to pack water in their school bag.

Dehydration can be serious so make sure to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, especially during these hotter months. Pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions may need to drink more fluids than normal so please check with your GP.

Stay healthy,

Leanne x

 

 

 

 

 

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

We should be making an effort to stay hydrated every day, but it becomes particularly important in the heat, especially for children who are more likely to become dehydrated and may not recognise the signs of thirst straight away.

Hydration is key to health and wellbeing – are you making sure you’re drinking enough?

Why do I need to drink? I don’t feel thirsty.

For a start, water makes up approximately 2/3 of our body and it helps us to function properly. Water helps the body to remove waste products, keeps the skin looking good, controls temperature and lubricates the joints. It can also aid concentration levels.

Ok, so I need fluid. What should I be drinking and how much?

Adults need approximately 1.5-2 litres a day. The best way to hit your fluid intake is by drinking good old-fashioned water. It’s easily accessible, fat, calorie and sugar free – winner! You can also get your daily fluid intake from:

 

  • Flavoured Water if you find plain water boring, try adding fruit e.g. lemon/lime/orange. [A nice combination is slices of orange and sprigs of rosemary.]
  • Tap water is fine to drink, there is no need to buy bottled water in this country.
  • Fruit juices/smoothies also count as one of your 5 a day but limit them to one a day. When fruit is processed, e.g. blended, the fruit releases more sugars than if you were to eat raw. They can also be acidic which can cause problems for your teeth.
  • Squash try to choose no added sugar or sugar free options, again this will protect your family’s teeth.
  • Milk is great for providing us with vitamins, protein and calcium – we need calcium for healthy teeth and bones. Opt for semi-skimmed or skimmed milk to lower the fat content. Children under 2 should drink full fat milk.
  • Tea/coffee count towards your daily fluid goals as long as you drink them in moderation.  Switch to decaffeinated versions where possible (I know the morning struggle is real!) Caffeine makes you urinate more, leaving you less hydrated! Fruit and herbal teas are good alternatives, (I know what you’re thinking ‘no-one ever solved their problems over a cup of strawberry and chamomile’ but there are some lovely flavours out there!)
  • Fizzy drinks often contain caffeine and sugar. Limit your intake and pick low sugar and caffeine free versions where possible.
  • Alcohol Sorry everyone – that G & T doesn’t count towards your daily fluid intake! Alcohol can dehydrate you…hands up who’s been out for a couple of drinks and walked their 10,000 steps just going back and forwards to the toilet?

Please drink responsibly: in the heat we can often drink quicker than we intend to.

I’ve never been dehydrated surely, I’m ok?

  • Dehydration may not make us feel ill
  • Thirst is usually the first sign
  • We may urinate less and urine may be darker (A well-hydrated person will have light coloured urine)
  • Other signs of dehydration are headaches, feeling tired or dizzy, dry mouth/lips or cramps.

 

What about my children?

Children are more likely to become dehydrated. Children should aim to drink about 6-8 glasses of fluid a day. Water is the best drink for children. Try to encourage your children to have drinks with meals, get them to have extra drinks if being physically active and make sure to pack water in their school bag.

Dehydration can be serious so make sure to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, especially during these hotter months. Pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions may need to drink more fluids than normal so please check with your GP.

Stay healthy,

Leanne x

 

 

 

 

 

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

We should be making an effort to stay hydrated every day, but it becomes particularly important in the heat, especially for children who are more likely to become dehydrated and may not recognise the signs of thirst straight away.

Hydration is key to health and wellbeing – are you making sure you’re drinking enough?

Why do I need to drink? I don’t feel thirsty.

For a start, water makes up approximately 2/3 of our body and it helps us to function properly. Water helps the body to remove waste products, keeps the skin looking good, controls temperature and lubricates the joints. It can also aid concentration levels.

Ok, so I need fluid. What should I be drinking and how much?

Adults need approximately 1.5-2 litres a day. The best way to hit your fluid intake is by drinking good old-fashioned water. It’s easily accessible, fat, calorie and sugar free – winner! You can also get your daily fluid intake from:

 

  • Flavoured Water if you find plain water boring, try adding fruit e.g. lemon/lime/orange. [A nice combination is slices of orange and sprigs of rosemary.]
  • Tap water is fine to drink, there is no need to buy bottled water in this country.
  • Fruit juices/smoothies also count as one of your 5 a day but limit them to one a day. When fruit is processed, e.g. blended, the fruit releases more sugars than if you were to eat raw. They can also be acidic which can cause problems for your teeth.
  • Squash try to choose no added sugar or sugar free options, again this will protect your family’s teeth.
  • Milk is great for providing us with vitamins, protein and calcium – we need calcium for healthy teeth and bones. Opt for semi-skimmed or skimmed milk to lower the fat content. Children under 2 should drink full fat milk.
  • Tea/coffee count towards your daily fluid goals as long as you drink them in moderation.  Switch to decaffeinated versions where possible (I know the morning struggle is real!) Caffeine makes you urinate more, leaving you less hydrated! Fruit and herbal teas are good alternatives, (I know what you’re thinking ‘no-one ever solved their problems over a cup of strawberry and chamomile’ but there are some lovely flavours out there!)
  • Fizzy drinks often contain caffeine and sugar. Limit your intake and pick low sugar and caffeine free versions where possible.
  • Alcohol Sorry everyone – that G & T doesn’t count towards your daily fluid intake! Alcohol can dehydrate you…hands up who’s been out for a couple of drinks and walked their 10,000 steps just going back and forwards to the toilet?

Please drink responsibly: in the heat we can often drink quicker than we intend to.

I’ve never been dehydrated surely, I’m ok?

  • Dehydration may not make us feel ill
  • Thirst is usually the first sign
  • We may urinate less and urine may be darker (A well-hydrated person will have light coloured urine)
  • Other signs of dehydration are headaches, feeling tired or dizzy, dry mouth/lips or cramps.

 

What about my children?

Children are more likely to become dehydrated. Children should aim to drink about 6-8 glasses of fluid a day. Water is the best drink for children. Try to encourage your children to have drinks with meals, get them to have extra drinks if being physically active and make sure to pack water in their school bag.

Dehydration can be serious so make sure to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, especially during these hotter months. Pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions may need to drink more fluids than normal so please check with your GP.

Stay healthy,

Leanne x

 

 

 

 

 

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

We should be making an effort to stay hydrated every day, but it becomes particularly important in the heat, especially for children who are more likely to become dehydrated and may not recognise the signs of thirst straight away.

Hydration is key to health and wellbeing – are you making sure you’re drinking enough?

Why do I need to drink? I don’t feel thirsty.

For a start, water makes up approximately 2/3 of our body and it helps us to function properly. Water helps the body to remove waste products, keeps the skin looking good, controls temperature and lubricates the joints. It can also aid concentration levels.

Ok, so I need fluid. What should I be drinking and how much?

Adults need approximately 1.5-2 litres a day. The best way to hit your fluid intake is by drinking good old-fashioned water. It’s easily accessible, fat, calorie and sugar free – winner! You can also get your daily fluid intake from:

 

  • Flavoured Water if you find plain water boring, try adding fruit e.g. lemon/lime/orange. [A nice combination is slices of orange and sprigs of rosemary.]
  • Tap water is fine to drink, there is no need to buy bottled water in this country.
  • Fruit juices/smoothies also count as one of your 5 a day but limit them to one a day. When fruit is processed, e.g. blended, the fruit releases more sugars than if you were to eat raw. They can also be acidic which can cause problems for your teeth.
  • Squash try to choose no added sugar or sugar free options, again this will protect your family’s teeth.
  • Milk is great for providing us with vitamins, protein and calcium – we need calcium for healthy teeth and bones. Opt for semi-skimmed or skimmed milk to lower the fat content. Children under 2 should drink full fat milk.
  • Tea/coffee count towards your daily fluid goals as long as you drink them in moderation.  Switch to decaffeinated versions where possible (I know the morning struggle is real!) Caffeine makes you urinate more, leaving you less hydrated! Fruit and herbal teas are good alternatives, (I know what you’re thinking ‘no-one ever solved their problems over a cup of strawberry and chamomile’ but there are some lovely flavours out there!)
  • Fizzy drinks often contain caffeine and sugar. Limit your intake and pick low sugar and caffeine free versions where possible.
  • Alcohol Sorry everyone – that G & T doesn’t count towards your daily fluid intake! Alcohol can dehydrate you…hands up who’s been out for a couple of drinks and walked their 10,000 steps just going back and forwards to the toilet?

Please drink responsibly: in the heat we can often drink quicker than we intend to.

I’ve never been dehydrated surely, I’m ok?

  • Dehydration may not make us feel ill
  • Thirst is usually the first sign
  • We may urinate less and urine may be darker (A well-hydrated person will have light coloured urine)
  • Other signs of dehydration are headaches, feeling tired or dizzy, dry mouth/lips or cramps.

 

What about my children?

Children are more likely to become dehydrated. Children should aim to drink about 6-8 glasses of fluid a day. Water is the best drink for children. Try to encourage your children to have drinks with meals, get them to have extra drinks if being physically active and make sure to pack water in their school bag.

Dehydration can be serious so make sure to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, especially during these hotter months. Pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions may need to drink more fluids than normal so please check with your GP.

Stay healthy,

Leanne x

 

 

 

 

 

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

We should be making an effort to stay hydrated every day, but it becomes particularly important in the heat, especially for children who are more likely to become dehydrated and may not recognise the signs of thirst straight away.

Hydration is key to health and wellbeing – are you making sure you’re drinking enough?

Why do I need to drink? I don’t feel thirsty.

For a start, water makes up approximately 2/3 of our body and it helps us to function properly. Water helps the body to remove waste products, keeps the skin looking good, controls temperature and lubricates the joints. It can also aid concentration levels.

Ok, so I need fluid. What should I be drinking and how much?

Adults need approximately 1.5-2 litres a day. The best way to hit your fluid intake is by drinking good old-fashioned water. It’s easily accessible, fat, calorie and sugar free – winner! You can also get your daily fluid intake from:

 

  • Flavoured Water if you find plain water boring, try adding fruit e.g. lemon/lime/orange. [A nice combination is slices of orange and sprigs of rosemary.]
  • Tap water is fine to drink, there is no need to buy bottled water in this country.
  • Fruit juices/smoothies also count as one of your 5 a day but limit them to one a day. When fruit is processed, e.g. blended, the fruit releases more sugars than if you were to eat raw. They can also be acidic which can cause problems for your teeth.
  • Squash try to choose no added sugar or sugar free options, again this will protect your family’s teeth.
  • Milk is great for providing us with vitamins, protein and calcium – we need calcium for healthy teeth and bones. Opt for semi-skimmed or skimmed milk to lower the fat content. Children under 2 should drink full fat milk.
  • Tea/coffee count towards your daily fluid goals as long as you drink them in moderation.  Switch to decaffeinated versions where possible (I know the morning struggle is real!) Caffeine makes you urinate more, leaving you less hydrated! Fruit and herbal teas are good alternatives, (I know what you’re thinking ‘no-one ever solved their problems over a cup of strawberry and chamomile’ but there are some lovely flavours out there!)
  • Fizzy drinks often contain caffeine and sugar. Limit your intake and pick low sugar and caffeine free versions where possible.
  • Alcohol Sorry everyone – that G & T doesn’t count towards your daily fluid intake! Alcohol can dehydrate you…hands up who’s been out for a couple of drinks and walked their 10,000 steps just going back and forwards to the toilet?

Please drink responsibly: in the heat we can often drink quicker than we intend to.

I’ve never been dehydrated surely, I’m ok?

  • Dehydration may not make us feel ill
  • Thirst is usually the first sign
  • We may urinate less and urine may be darker (A well-hydrated person will have light coloured urine)
  • Other signs of dehydration are headaches, feeling tired or dizzy, dry mouth/lips or cramps.

 

What about my children?

Children are more likely to become dehydrated. Children should aim to drink about 6-8 glasses of fluid a day. Water is the best drink for children. Try to encourage your children to have drinks with meals, get them to have extra drinks if being physically active and make sure to pack water in their school bag.

Dehydration can be serious so make sure to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, especially during these hotter months. Pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions may need to drink more fluids than normal so please check with your GP.

Stay healthy,

Leanne x

 

 

 

 

 

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

We should be making an effort to stay hydrated every day, but it becomes particularly important in the heat, especially for children who are more likely to become dehydrated and may not recognise the signs of thirst straight away.

Hydration is key to health and wellbeing – are you making sure you’re drinking enough?

Why do I need to drink? I don’t feel thirsty.

For a start, water makes up approximately 2/3 of our body and it helps us to function properly. Water helps the body to remove waste products, keeps the skin looking good, controls temperature and lubricates the joints. It can also aid concentration levels.

Ok, so I need fluid. What should I be drinking and how much?

Adults need approximately 1.5-2 litres a day. The best way to hit your fluid intake is by drinking good old-fashioned water. It’s easily accessible, fat, calorie and sugar free – winner! You can also get your daily fluid intake from:

 

  • Flavoured Water if you find plain water boring, try adding fruit e.g. lemon/lime/orange. [A nice combination is slices of orange and sprigs of rosemary.]
  • Tap water is fine to drink, there is no need to buy bottled water in this country.
  • Fruit juices/smoothies also count as one of your 5 a day but limit them to one a day. When fruit is processed, e.g. blended, the fruit releases more sugars than if you were to eat raw. They can also be acidic which can cause problems for your teeth.
  • Squash try to choose no added sugar or sugar free options, again this will protect your family’s teeth.
  • Milk is great for providing us with vitamins, protein and calcium – we need calcium for healthy teeth and bones. Opt for semi-skimmed or skimmed milk to lower the fat content. Children under 2 should drink full fat milk.
  • Tea/coffee count towards your daily fluid goals as long as you drink them in moderation.  Switch to decaffeinated versions where possible (I know the morning struggle is real!) Caffeine makes you urinate more, leaving you less hydrated! Fruit and herbal teas are good alternatives, (I know what you’re thinking ‘no-one ever solved their problems over a cup of strawberry and chamomile’ but there are some lovely flavours out there!)
  • Fizzy drinks often contain caffeine and sugar. Limit your intake and pick low sugar and caffeine free versions where possible.
  • Alcohol Sorry everyone – that G & T doesn’t count towards your daily fluid intake! Alcohol can dehydrate you…hands up who’s been out for a couple of drinks and walked their 10,000 steps just going back and forwards to the toilet?

Please drink responsibly: in the heat we can often drink quicker than we intend to.

I’ve never been dehydrated surely, I’m ok?

  • Dehydration may not make us feel ill
  • Thirst is usually the first sign
  • We may urinate less and urine may be darker (A well-hydrated person will have light coloured urine)
  • Other signs of dehydration are headaches, feeling tired or dizzy, dry mouth/lips or cramps.

 

What about my children?

Children are more likely to become dehydrated. Children should aim to drink about 6-8 glasses of fluid a day. Water is the best drink for children. Try to encourage your children to have drinks with meals, get them to have extra drinks if being physically active and make sure to pack water in their school bag.

Dehydration can be serious so make sure to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, especially during these hotter months. Pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions may need to drink more fluids than normal so please check with your GP.

Stay healthy,

Leanne x

 

 

 

 

 

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