Select Page

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

We should be making an effort to stay hydrated every day, but it becomes particularly important in the heat, especially for children who are more likely to become dehydrated and may not recognise the signs of thirst straight away.

Hydration is key to health and wellbeing – are you making sure you’re drinking enough?

Why do I need to drink? I don’t feel thirsty.

For a start, water makes up approximately 2/3 of our body and it helps us to function properly. Water helps the body to remove waste products, keeps the skin looking good, controls temperature and lubricates the joints. It can also aid concentration levels.

Ok, so I need fluid. What should I be drinking and how much?

Adults need approximately 1.5-2 litres a day. The best way to hit your fluid intake is by drinking good old-fashioned water. It’s easily accessible, fat, calorie and sugar free – winner! You can also get your daily fluid intake from:

 

  • Flavoured Water if you find plain water boring, try adding fruit e.g. lemon/lime/orange. [A nice combination is slices of orange and sprigs of rosemary.]
  • Tap water is fine to drink, there is no need to buy bottled water in this country.
  • Fruit juices/smoothies also count as one of your 5 a day but limit them to one a day. When fruit is processed, e.g. blended, the fruit releases more sugars than if you were to eat raw. They can also be acidic which can cause problems for your teeth.
  • Squash try to choose no added sugar or sugar free options, again this will protect your family’s teeth.
  • Milk is great for providing us with vitamins, protein and calcium – we need calcium for healthy teeth and bones. Opt for semi-skimmed or skimmed milk to lower the fat content. Children under 2 should drink full fat milk.
  • Tea/coffee count towards your daily fluid goals as long as you drink them in moderation.  Switch to decaffeinated versions where possible (I know the morning struggle is real!) Caffeine makes you urinate more, leaving you less hydrated! Fruit and herbal teas are good alternatives, (I know what you’re thinking ‘no-one ever solved their problems over a cup of strawberry and chamomile’ but there are some lovely flavours out there!)
  • Fizzy drinks often contain caffeine and sugar. Limit your intake and pick low sugar and caffeine free versions where possible.
  • Alcohol Sorry everyone – that G & T doesn’t count towards your daily fluid intake! Alcohol can dehydrate you…hands up who’s been out for a couple of drinks and walked their 10,000 steps just going back and forwards to the toilet?

Please drink responsibly: in the heat we can often drink quicker than we intend to.

I’ve never been dehydrated surely, I’m ok?

  • Dehydration may not make us feel ill
  • Thirst is usually the first sign
  • We may urinate less and urine may be darker (A well-hydrated person will have light coloured urine)
  • Other signs of dehydration are headaches, feeling tired or dizzy, dry mouth/lips or cramps.

 

What about my children?

Children are more likely to become dehydrated. Children should aim to drink about 6-8 glasses of fluid a day. Water is the best drink for children. Try to encourage your children to have drinks with meals, get them to have extra drinks if being physically active and make sure to pack water in their school bag.

Dehydration can be serious so make sure to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, especially during these hotter months. Pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions may need to drink more fluids than normal so please check with your GP.

Stay healthy,

Leanne x

 

 

 

 

 

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

We should be making an effort to stay hydrated every day, but it becomes particularly important in the heat, especially for children who are more likely to become dehydrated and may not recognise the signs of thirst straight away.

Hydration is key to health and wellbeing – are you making sure you’re drinking enough?

Why do I need to drink? I don’t feel thirsty.

For a start, water makes up approximately 2/3 of our body and it helps us to function properly. Water helps the body to remove waste products, keeps the skin looking good, controls temperature and lubricates the joints. It can also aid concentration levels.

Ok, so I need fluid. What should I be drinking and how much?

Adults need approximately 1.5-2 litres a day. The best way to hit your fluid intake is by drinking good old-fashioned water. It’s easily accessible, fat, calorie and sugar free – winner! You can also get your daily fluid intake from:

 

  • Flavoured Water if you find plain water boring, try adding fruit e.g. lemon/lime/orange. [A nice combination is slices of orange and sprigs of rosemary.]
  • Tap water is fine to drink, there is no need to buy bottled water in this country.
  • Fruit juices/smoothies also count as one of your 5 a day but limit them to one a day. When fruit is processed, e.g. blended, the fruit releases more sugars than if you were to eat raw. They can also be acidic which can cause problems for your teeth.
  • Squash try to choose no added sugar or sugar free options, again this will protect your family’s teeth.
  • Milk is great for providing us with vitamins, protein and calcium – we need calcium for healthy teeth and bones. Opt for semi-skimmed or skimmed milk to lower the fat content. Children under 2 should drink full fat milk.
  • Tea/coffee count towards your daily fluid goals as long as you drink them in moderation.  Switch to decaffeinated versions where possible (I know the morning struggle is real!) Caffeine makes you urinate more, leaving you less hydrated! Fruit and herbal teas are good alternatives, (I know what you’re thinking ‘no-one ever solved their problems over a cup of strawberry and chamomile’ but there are some lovely flavours out there!)
  • Fizzy drinks often contain caffeine and sugar. Limit your intake and pick low sugar and caffeine free versions where possible.
  • Alcohol Sorry everyone – that G & T doesn’t count towards your daily fluid intake! Alcohol can dehydrate you…hands up who’s been out for a couple of drinks and walked their 10,000 steps just going back and forwards to the toilet?

Please drink responsibly: in the heat we can often drink quicker than we intend to.

I’ve never been dehydrated surely, I’m ok?

  • Dehydration may not make us feel ill
  • Thirst is usually the first sign
  • We may urinate less and urine may be darker (A well-hydrated person will have light coloured urine)
  • Other signs of dehydration are headaches, feeling tired or dizzy, dry mouth/lips or cramps.

 

What about my children?

Children are more likely to become dehydrated. Children should aim to drink about 6-8 glasses of fluid a day. Water is the best drink for children. Try to encourage your children to have drinks with meals, get them to have extra drinks if being physically active and make sure to pack water in their school bag.

Dehydration can be serious so make sure to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, especially during these hotter months. Pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions may need to drink more fluids than normal so please check with your GP.

Stay healthy,

Leanne x

 

 

 

 

 

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

We should be making an effort to stay hydrated every day, but it becomes particularly important in the heat, especially for children who are more likely to become dehydrated and may not recognise the signs of thirst straight away.

Hydration is key to health and wellbeing – are you making sure you’re drinking enough?

Why do I need to drink? I don’t feel thirsty.

For a start, water makes up approximately 2/3 of our body and it helps us to function properly. Water helps the body to remove waste products, keeps the skin looking good, controls temperature and lubricates the joints. It can also aid concentration levels.

Ok, so I need fluid. What should I be drinking and how much?

Adults need approximately 1.5-2 litres a day. The best way to hit your fluid intake is by drinking good old-fashioned water. It’s easily accessible, fat, calorie and sugar free – winner! You can also get your daily fluid intake from:

 

  • Flavoured Water if you find plain water boring, try adding fruit e.g. lemon/lime/orange. [A nice combination is slices of orange and sprigs of rosemary.]
  • Tap water is fine to drink, there is no need to buy bottled water in this country.
  • Fruit juices/smoothies also count as one of your 5 a day but limit them to one a day. When fruit is processed, e.g. blended, the fruit releases more sugars than if you were to eat raw. They can also be acidic which can cause problems for your teeth.
  • Squash try to choose no added sugar or sugar free options, again this will protect your family’s teeth.
  • Milk is great for providing us with vitamins, protein and calcium – we need calcium for healthy teeth and bones. Opt for semi-skimmed or skimmed milk to lower the fat content. Children under 2 should drink full fat milk.
  • Tea/coffee count towards your daily fluid goals as long as you drink them in moderation.  Switch to decaffeinated versions where possible (I know the morning struggle is real!) Caffeine makes you urinate more, leaving you less hydrated! Fruit and herbal teas are good alternatives, (I know what you’re thinking ‘no-one ever solved their problems over a cup of strawberry and chamomile’ but there are some lovely flavours out there!)
  • Fizzy drinks often contain caffeine and sugar. Limit your intake and pick low sugar and caffeine free versions where possible.
  • Alcohol Sorry everyone – that G & T doesn’t count towards your daily fluid intake! Alcohol can dehydrate you…hands up who’s been out for a couple of drinks and walked their 10,000 steps just going back and forwards to the toilet?

Please drink responsibly: in the heat we can often drink quicker than we intend to.

I’ve never been dehydrated surely, I’m ok?

  • Dehydration may not make us feel ill
  • Thirst is usually the first sign
  • We may urinate less and urine may be darker (A well-hydrated person will have light coloured urine)
  • Other signs of dehydration are headaches, feeling tired or dizzy, dry mouth/lips or cramps.

 

What about my children?

Children are more likely to become dehydrated. Children should aim to drink about 6-8 glasses of fluid a day. Water is the best drink for children. Try to encourage your children to have drinks with meals, get them to have extra drinks if being physically active and make sure to pack water in their school bag.

Dehydration can be serious so make sure to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, especially during these hotter months. Pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions may need to drink more fluids than normal so please check with your GP.

Stay healthy,

Leanne x

 

 

 

 

 

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

We should be making an effort to stay hydrated every day, but it becomes particularly important in the heat, especially for children who are more likely to become dehydrated and may not recognise the signs of thirst straight away.

Hydration is key to health and wellbeing – are you making sure you’re drinking enough?

Why do I need to drink? I don’t feel thirsty.

For a start, water makes up approximately 2/3 of our body and it helps us to function properly. Water helps the body to remove waste products, keeps the skin looking good, controls temperature and lubricates the joints. It can also aid concentration levels.

Ok, so I need fluid. What should I be drinking and how much?

Adults need approximately 1.5-2 litres a day. The best way to hit your fluid intake is by drinking good old-fashioned water. It’s easily accessible, fat, calorie and sugar free – winner! You can also get your daily fluid intake from:

 

  • Flavoured Water if you find plain water boring, try adding fruit e.g. lemon/lime/orange. [A nice combination is slices of orange and sprigs of rosemary.]
  • Tap water is fine to drink, there is no need to buy bottled water in this country.
  • Fruit juices/smoothies also count as one of your 5 a day but limit them to one a day. When fruit is processed, e.g. blended, the fruit releases more sugars than if you were to eat raw. They can also be acidic which can cause problems for your teeth.
  • Squash try to choose no added sugar or sugar free options, again this will protect your family’s teeth.
  • Milk is great for providing us with vitamins, protein and calcium – we need calcium for healthy teeth and bones. Opt for semi-skimmed or skimmed milk to lower the fat content. Children under 2 should drink full fat milk.
  • Tea/coffee count towards your daily fluid goals as long as you drink them in moderation.  Switch to decaffeinated versions where possible (I know the morning struggle is real!) Caffeine makes you urinate more, leaving you less hydrated! Fruit and herbal teas are good alternatives, (I know what you’re thinking ‘no-one ever solved their problems over a cup of strawberry and chamomile’ but there are some lovely flavours out there!)
  • Fizzy drinks often contain caffeine and sugar. Limit your intake and pick low sugar and caffeine free versions where possible.
  • Alcohol Sorry everyone – that G & T doesn’t count towards your daily fluid intake! Alcohol can dehydrate you…hands up who’s been out for a couple of drinks and walked their 10,000 steps just going back and forwards to the toilet?

Please drink responsibly: in the heat we can often drink quicker than we intend to.

I’ve never been dehydrated surely, I’m ok?

  • Dehydration may not make us feel ill
  • Thirst is usually the first sign
  • We may urinate less and urine may be darker (A well-hydrated person will have light coloured urine)
  • Other signs of dehydration are headaches, feeling tired or dizzy, dry mouth/lips or cramps.

 

What about my children?

Children are more likely to become dehydrated. Children should aim to drink about 6-8 glasses of fluid a day. Water is the best drink for children. Try to encourage your children to have drinks with meals, get them to have extra drinks if being physically active and make sure to pack water in their school bag.

Dehydration can be serious so make sure to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, especially during these hotter months. Pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions may need to drink more fluids than normal so please check with your GP.

Stay healthy,

Leanne x

 

 

 

 

 

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate!

We should be making an effort to stay hydrated every day, but it becomes particularly important in the heat, especially for children who are more likely to become dehydrated and may not recognise the signs of thirst straight away.

Hydration is key to health and wellbeing – are you making sure you’re drinking enough?

Why do I need to drink? I don’t feel thirsty.

For a start, water makes up approximately 2/3 of our body and it helps us to function properly. Water helps the body to remove waste products, keeps the skin looking good, controls temperature and lubricates the joints. It can also aid concentration levels.

Ok, so I need fluid. What should I be drinking and how much?

Adults need approximately 1.5-2 litres a day. The best way to hit your fluid intake is by drinking good old-fashioned water. It’s easily accessible, fat, calorie and sugar free – winner! You can also get your daily fluid intake from:

 

  • Flavoured Water if you find plain water boring, try adding fruit e.g. lemon/lime/orange. [A nice combination is slices of orange and sprigs of rosemary.]
  • Tap water is fine to drink, there is no need to buy bottled water in this country.
  • Fruit juices/smoothies also count as one of your 5 a day but limit them to one a day. When fruit is processed, e.g. blended, the fruit releases more sugars than if you were to eat raw. They can also be acidic which can cause problems for your teeth.
  • Squash try to choose no added sugar or sugar free options, again this will protect your family’s teeth.
  • Milk is great for providing us with vitamins, protein and calcium – we need calcium for healthy teeth and bones. Opt for semi-skimmed or skimmed milk to lower the fat content. Children under 2 should drink full fat milk.
  • Tea/coffee count towards your daily fluid goals as long as you drink them in moderation.  Switch to decaffeinated versions where possible (I know the morning struggle is real!) Caffeine makes you urinate more, leaving you less hydrated! Fruit and herbal teas are good alternatives, (I know what you’re thinking ‘no-one ever solved their problems over a cup of strawberry and chamomile’ but there are some lovely flavours out there!)
  • Fizzy drinks often contain caffeine and sugar. Limit your intake and pick low sugar and caffeine free versions where possible.
  • Alcohol Sorry everyone – that G & T doesn’t count towards your daily fluid intake! Alcohol can dehydrate you…hands up who’s been out for a couple of drinks and walked their 10,000 steps just going back and forwards to the toilet?

Please drink responsibly: in the heat we can often drink quicker than we intend to.

I’ve never been dehydrated surely, I’m ok?

  • Dehydration may not make us feel ill
  • Thirst is usually the first sign
  • We may urinate less and urine may be darker (A well-hydrated person will have light coloured urine)
  • Other signs of dehydration are headaches, feeling tired or dizzy, dry mouth/lips or cramps.

 

What about my children?

Children are more likely to become dehydrated. Children should aim to drink about 6-8 glasses of fluid a day. Water is the best drink for children. Try to encourage your children to have drinks with meals, get them to have extra drinks if being physically active and make sure to pack water in their school bag.

Dehydration can be serious so make sure to drink plenty of fluids throughout the day, especially during these hotter months. Pregnant women and those with certain medical conditions may need to drink more fluids than normal so please check with your GP.

Stay healthy,

Leanne x

 

 

 

 

 

Leanne Hawker

Leanne Hawker

Resident Food Champion and Health & Wellness Columnist

I started working in the fitness industry over 15 years ago and have since developed even more of a love for all things health and wellness. I have trained to be an NHS Food Champion, which basically means I can help people find a healthier way to eat and have also completed another Level 3 nutrition qualification. I am qualified in Children’s fitness and a Stop Smoking Advisor. I also have experience in motivational coaching. My mission is to help people find a fun way to get fit and sift through all the madness to help find a more balanced approach to healthy living, both mental and physical. When I’m not thinking about health I can probably be found reading and trying not to eat Nutella from the jar!

If you’re interested in trying any of Leanne’s community fitness classes your first session is always free. Please visit her Facebook page for more information.

Our Advertisers

Edu-life Kids

Subscribe To Educational Life

Would you like to get a copy of our digital magazine straight into your inbox? Then subscribe here and we will make sure that a copy wings it’s way to you.




We will only send you a copy of our digital magazine, bi-monthly when it is released. We will not send you any other emails or marketing material at any time.

If you decide you no longer want to receive a copy of the magazine, you may unsubscribe at any time.

Thank you for your continued support, The Educational Life Team.